Algonquin

 

Welcome to the Carpentersville Memories Algonquin Page. Our goal is to bring back some fun memories of growing up in the 50s, 60s, 70s and 80s. Please take your time and check out all of the Algonquin images and files, they are sure to bring back many memories.

 

We bring back Memories you didn’t know you had

What was Algonquin like way back in the olden days?

Algonquin was a place where we all felt safe, any time of day or night.  A place we called home, a place with friends, family and great people.  Whether you lived there for a year or a life time, the memories of Algonquin are forever in your mind.  Check out all of the Algonquin images and files we have been collecting.

The History of Algonquin


Long before Europeans settled in Algonquin, the Potawatomi Native Americans originally inhabited the land. Algonquin was the location of Indian burial mounds known in the 1800s as the Algonquin Mounds. By 1834 the first settler of Algonquin, Samuel Gillilan, came to the area from Virginia. Settlers Dr. Cornish, Dr. Plumleigh, Eli Henderson, Alex Dawson, and William Jackson arrived shortly thereafter. There was some dispute regarding the original name of Algonquin, and numerous other names were suggested including Denny’s Ferry, Cornish Ferry, Cornishville, and Osceola. But Samuel Edwards suggested the name Algonquin and on December 23, 1847, the name Algonquin became official.

The first signs of economic growth occurred in 1855 when the town saw the construction of the railroad, which enabled farmers in the neighboring area to have other means of getting their products to the markets in Chicago. Finally on February 25, 1890, the Village of Algonquin was formed.

The Village Hall of Algonquin was erected on January 31, 1907, at 2 South Main Street, and is still standing today, where it functions as a historical landmark and community gathering place. It served as the village hall of Algonquin until a new village hall was built at 2200 Harnish Drive in 1996.

From 1906 to 1913, the automobile companies began to go to the Algonquin Hill Climbs, which was an event where if an automobile was able to make it up a series of steep hills in the village, it would be given the stamp of approval. And because of that, the Algonquin Cup was formed which received national recognition at the time. The two hills used in the race were the Phillips Hill which extends from Illinois Route 31 to the cemetery and Perry Hill, located south of downtown, and which is now Lundstrom Lane. The village created a new hill for the race called Huntington Hill, which is now Huntington Drive. A park stands in place of the finish line of Huntington Hill at the intersection of Huntington Drive and Circle Drive which is called Hill Climb Park. The festival in recognition of the event continues to be held each year.

Algonquin road route 62 now, was once noted as the first bridge to be installed on an incline. The first bridge was level with a steep incline headed east. It was later replaced with a 4 lane bridge with an incline to reduce stress on vehicles headed east.

For much of the 20th century, Algonquin was a quasi-resort town and people from the Chicago area would visit the town in order to escape urban life. The Fox River offered immense recreational opportunities and several summer homes were constructed. Soon, more people began living in Algonquin year-round. Algonquin remained a small town for much of the 20th Century, growing steadily, until the 1980s, when the village’s population exploded with new residential construction. The development continued in earnest in the 1990s and 2000s. The village’s first shopping center, Algonquin Town Center, was constructed in the late 1980s on East Algonquin Road and numerous die & mold industries were established west of downtown. In the 1990s, development shifted to Randall Road, which saw the construction of numerous retailers, restaurants, and services, beginning in 1993. In 2004, the 80-store Algonquin Commons outdoor mall (the largest outdoor mall in Illinois) opened for business, followed by the Algonquin Galleria outdoor mall, which is under development and saw its first stores open in 2006. In the mid-2000s, development also began on the Algonquin Corporate Campus, which is slated to include industrial and office development spread over 1,000 acres (4.0 km2) on the southwest side of the village, bringing hundreds of high-paying jobs to the area.

The Algonquin Founders’ Days Festival, a favorite memory of many, began in 1961 with a group of local businessmen who wanted to celebrate their community. Fifty-nine years later that tradition continues. Every year a group of dedicated volunteers work to bring families, friends and neighbors together to enjoy a family-friendly four day event, with something for everyone including: Great music, Food, Carnival, Kids Korner, Outdoor Business Expo, Family Olympics, one of the longest standing parades in the state. The Fest concludes with Algonquin’s Founders’ Days Fireworks Spectacular.

Algonquin Then and Now 2007 PDF

Founder’s Days Collector’s Edition 1972 PDF

Founder’s Days Committee Letter of Incorporation 1967 PDF

Visit the Simonini’s Restaurant Page

Various Early Images From Algonquin’s Past 1800 – 1950s

Various 50s – 80s Images From Algonquin’s Past

Algonquin Founder’s Days Collector’s Edition 1972

Some Fun Articles About The New Place

Testimonials

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Lets me relive some of my childhood every chance I get

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So much to see and so many memories, this is an amazing web site “

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Always something new every time I visit the site

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Couldn’t believe all there was to see for such a small yearly subscription, and complete Yearbooks too !!”

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